CORPRENEUR

Columnist . Amy Jauman  

 

Traditional to Micro and (Not Really) Back Again

I missed having a steady team… to bounce ideas off of …

 The Traditional Office Job
I decided to become a solopreneur in 2012 – the day I realized I wasn’t doing what I felt was meaningful work anymore. My organization was in a very long change cycle and the education materials I was creating typically never saw the light of day. At some point, I had given up.

 Working as a Micro to in a Micro
I loved the 5 years I spent working as a business owner and consultant. I never fully enjoyed the hustle for new clients, but as I did more work, I received more referrals, and the hustle took less and less of my time. I missed having a steady team – people to share successes with and bounce ideas off of, but my clients were great resources for that.

All in all, I was pretty happy as my own little microbusiness.

But when the opportunity with the National Institute for Social Media (NISM) emerged, I knew it was the best of both worlds. Today I have the team and consistent goals I didn’t have as a microbusiness owner as well as the ability to make a difference in our market. There’s no chance an idea will get lost in the shuffle or sit unnoticed. We are small, mighty, and agile – traits in an organization I have come to admire.
 What Would I Do Differently?
I don’t regret going out on my own. I was motivated by the work I wanted to do. I know I’m better for all that I experienced – the good and the bad. But here’s what I would do differently if I was a new micro all over again:

I would think strategically about how I was spending my time and money. One benefit to joining others in a microbusiness as opposed to being on my own is the accountability and inspiration that comes from routine meetings. When you feel too busy to strategize, you miss opportunities to work in smarter ways.

Five years after leaving a traditional work environment to become a microbusiness, I’ve turned another page and joined a microbusiness. I’ve enjoyed learning about all of the different ways a person can be successful. I continue to work with individuals, microbusinesses, and traditional organizations – and I’m happy to report that I’ve found just the right way I can contribute.